We have to go back

I just got done watching the entire series of Lost on Netflix for the second time. What a trip. What story telling. This time around things came a little bit easier. I more often had “aha!” moments and more than a few head-nods to the writer’s foreshadowing. For having gone as long as it did, for having kept almost all of its cast members the entire time, for having a grand story arch they stuck to and finished, and for the sheer magnitude of the undertaking, I can’t think of a better television series. Believe me, I’m a Browncoat, so you can take that to the bank. ;) So, if we have to go back, here are my main take-aways from the show’s six-year run…*spoiler warning*

Continue reading “We have to go back”

Forcing the writing instinct… in the (earlier) morning

Yesterday, I managed to start a search for better mornings, after experiencing very enjoyable mornings in PEI on vacation, by waking up an hour earlier with the hope that I would have time for coffee, breakfast, and time to just relax in the morning before going to work. As my brother so often does, I’ve been attempting to write blogs as something to keep productive, yet relaxed, these mornings.

Micah, my brother, writes about anything and everything, from Bible prophecy, creation, and coffee, to living on the island, mowing his yard, or working on his seadoo. Nothing earth shattering, just normal, everyday stuff. It sounds like a  good idea just to get the juices flowing in the morning and keep the mind active.

And, so, my first two early morning blogs are about (surprise) early mornings and blogs. It’s been interesting. Before this, I thought I’d be too foggy or tired to have the will to write something but actually it’s been okay. This isn’t the greatest or deepest prose in the world but it’s nice to put something out there and be part of the ongoing conversation online and between friends and family.

Who knows were I’ll go next, but in attempting to find better mornings, I’m glad I can do something I’ve enjoyed at other times and in other places.

In this picture…

In this picture is a bale of hay. Another, smaller, lies to its right, some ways away. Dead grasses lie before it. The brown specks of Autumn lie behind. The waning sun shines upon it all and grants the place life and being…

In this picture is a bale of hay. Another, smaller, lies to its right, some ways away. Dead grasses lie before it. The brown specks of Autumn lie behind. The waning sun shines upon it all and grants this place life and being. A shadow is cast from this bale but it can not reach the fence on which you sit nor darken the thing I seek. The sun sets and Fall approaches, and it will endure many years.

Without this picture is another. It is cold, lifeless. The dead winter.

But there is no other picture, and, in this, is why sunshine can be seen breaking forth from the frame, does strike my face, and warms again my heart to hope.

Most Parentheticals Aren’t

Tip to the writer who wants to improve his craft: Avoid putting side-tracked thoughts in parentheses.

Tip to the writer who wants to improve his craft: Avoid putting side-tracked thoughts in parentheses. You’ll actually find that it works quite well, and looks much more professional, just placing it as the next sentence.

All Writing is Poetry.

The best poets concentrate words so well that just a few lines can be read as a full-on essay. Percy Bysshe Shelley’s Ode to a Skylark is one example. When understood in this way, Ode blooms with ideas and with striking similarities to how we write essays.

I used to be really into writing. I used to be a good speller, too, although you couldn’t tell these days.

In high school I took all the english and writing classes. After that, I didn’t concentrate on it so much. But I happened into a poetry 101 style course in one of my electives in college.

One thing I’ve discovered about writing–from a good writer–is that they are striving for poetry in whatever form of writing they are currently consumed with. Novel, text, sentence, quotation, treatise, song, fiction, non-fiction, all of these the best authors will attempt to fuse with the stylings of poetry.

Most poetry, I’ve found, are actually other forms of writing (expository, allegory, etc.) but they’re simply written in a highly compressed form. Poetry is, at its heart, the concentration of the language in order to retain only the most potent and relevant words. Techies would call it compression.

The best poets concentrate words so well that just a few lines can be read as a full-on essay. Percy Bysshe Shelley’s Ode to a Skylark is one example. When understood in this way, Ode blooms with ideas and with striking similarities to how we write essays.

Another form of writing, I think I may have pioneered, is the self quote, and I’ve only recently realized that its attraction is its poetry.

Many famous people are quoted. They are most often quoted from within a body of immediate context. Meaning they were giving a speech or were writing a book and a quotation has been pulled out.

The self quote, on the other hand, is a stand-alone writing. It has no body of context to draw on. It took me years to understand why I liked writing them. The reason, I’ve come to believe, is because I am writing poetry. The premise is similar. Concentrate a big thought into something bite-size, strategically writing in or leaving open thoughts that expand and support the main thrust.